Exhibits and Experiences

Skin serves an important purpose—keeping your insides in and the outside out. It doesn’t say anything about your character or abilities, yet skin color has become linked to power and hierarchy. “Race” isn’t real, biologically, but the experience of racism is as real as it gets. Come explore race through scientific, historical, and cultural lenses, and challenge yourself to explore your biases.

The Science Museum of Minnesota is actively working to undo systems of injustice and inequity. Learn more about our commitment in our Statement on Equity & Inclusion.

Side-by-side close-up photo of two different colored eyes on two different people.

RACE: Are We So Different?


Is race real? Not in the biological sense. But the idea of race has deep and devastating social consequences that harm all of us. Discover the origins of this powerful concept and how its legacy continues today.

The Bias Inside Us


Learn how to counter your implicit biases around race and identity and start conversations in your community to make it more inclusive of all kinds of people with The Bias Inside Us, a traveling exhibit from The Smithsonian Institution.
A colorful banner spelling "The Bias Inside Us" through interpretive shapes.

Skin: Living Armor, Evolving Identity


In the Skin: Living Armor, Evolving Identity exhibit, interactive displays will help you discover the properties of skin across an array of organisms and examine the meaning humans have associated with skin color.

Green Card STEM Voices


STEM professionals come together to share their immigration journeys. Meet them and learn how immigration has influenced their careers in science and see how they are contributing in their new home countries in the Green Card STEM Voices exhibit.
A mosaic of human faces.

Colorism


Most people think colorism and racism are the same—but they’re not. Youth discuss how subtle and obvious colorism permeates cultures around the world and causes harm through family dynamics, marketing, and the images we see everyday.